Which do you like?

March 27, 2015

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Thank you, MAM.

March 26, 2015

Beauty in Bloom begins today at the Milwaukee Art Museum, and they have very sweetly comped me a pair of tickets (my first “preme” as a blogger!)

 

2014 Second Place Winner

Johnny and I will be heading over this afternoon.

 

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Pushing the season.

March 25, 2015

Baby, it’s cold outside. But in here, we can control the temperature.  Kale, cabbage, broccoli, parsley (flat leaf and curly!) all green and beautiful.

lights

The setup is in the guest room, the lights on a timer (sorry for the early wake-up, Ed and Viv!)  A small fan and open windows helps to harden off the plants, so they will be hardy and ready for transplanting as soon as it warms up again.  6 flats of green food!

(For the record, Johnny and I opened the hive today to add pollen patties and put a few more holes in the syrup feeder.  The girls look beautiful!)

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Our first foreign exchange student was a young man form Ghana.  He had never seen snow before, so when it snowed in November, he thought it was magical.  When, after a long snowy winter and a beautiful thaw it then snowed again in March, his Facebook status said it all and became family legend:

winter

“The white devil is back.”

 

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Raised Beds

March 17, 2015

A few years ago, after a particularly wet, frustrating spring,  I spent a day building eight raised beds out of a pile of old lumber that had been sitting under a tarp since we finished the house. Johnny and Daniel Barber had taken the old garage down piece by piece instead of smashing it, so we had a pile of full dimensional oak.planting-bed

The wood wasn’t pretty, it might not last forever, but the price was right. Johnny later built another bed frame, so we have nine altogether, and he set them with a laser level, so they maximize sunlight. Last weekend, when the temps hit mid 60—warm for March in Wisconsin–the beds were frost-free.  I prepped them all for spring by turning over the top few inches of soil to expose weeds—no tilling ever necessary! Then, I planted peas, arugula, beets, lettuce, mesclun, and onions. No need to worry about soil compaction as no one ever walks in the beds (although once, at a party, Troy and Jackie tumbled into one while dancing in the moonlight. )bedsYesterday, Johnny covered 2 of them with clear plastic and hoops.  We hope to harvest salad in 3 weeks!

If you want help with your gardens in Lake Geneva or the surrounding area, give us a call at 262/248-7513.

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